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Need to Know: How big a need is cornerback for the Redskins?

Apr 5, 2016, 5:01 AM EDT

Breeland-vs.-Giants

Here is what you need to know on this Tuesday, April 5, 23 days before the NFL Draft.

Timeline

—The Redskins last played a game 86 days ago. It will be about 159 days until they play another one.

Days until: Redskins offseason workouts start 13; 2016 NFL draft 23; Redskins training camp starts 114

Hot topic

Jay Gruden is worried about the safety position but cornerback is not often mentioned as an area of concern for the Redskins. Should it be?

If the season started today the Redskins would line up Bashaud Breeland and Will Blackmon as the starters and put Quinton Dunbar in the slot.

Breeland is the best of the bunch. He is developing into a good corner, perhaps a very good one, but he is still a work in progress.

Blackmon did a fine job last year filling in for the injured Chris Culliver and DeAngelo Hall after joining the team early in the season. But he did well by that standard. Is he really a guy you want to count on starting on OTAs? Maybe you can get by with him but the spot is ripe for an upgrade.

Dunbar played pretty well in spots as a rookie last year. It’s nice to think that the converted wide receiver will continue to improve but there really is no guarantee.

Hall has moved to safety and Culliver is still recovering and may not be ready for training camp. Culliver can be a pretty good corner when healthy but at this point it’s hard to rely on him. Even before the season-ending injury he suffered in practice on Thanksgiving Day last year the Redskins never really saw a healthy Culliver.

To sum it up, the Redskins have Breeland, a fill in turned starter in Blackmon, a project with Dunbar, a question mark with Culliver, and Deshazor Everett, a good special teams player who is untested at corner.

Does this mean the Redskins need to draft a cornerback early later this month? Not necessarily but don’t be surprised if they do. While they may be able to get by with what they have they will need to upgrade the position if they are going to build a solid defense. Looking at the list of needs, it’s going to take a few more drafts to get that done.

Fan question of the day

The Redskins clearly are slow playing the running back situation. Right now, it’s quite precarious. The three on the roster who have NFL experience all are coming off of surgery. Matt Jones had a hip issue repaired, Chris Thompson had a shoulder injury fixed and Silas Redd is rehabbing a torn ACL he suffered in the preseason last year. Alfred Morris, of course, is now a member of the Dallas Cowboys.

Despite the situation, the Redskins did not jump at the chance to get in on the bidding for any of the top free agent running backs that were available. And they have stayed away from the group of lesser backs as well.

At the owners meetings last month, Jay Gruden indicated that Thomas is still in the Redskins’ radar. “There’s still some options out there [and] I think Pierre is one of them,” he said.

But here we are nearly two weeks later and still no Thomas. With draft just over three weeks away it appears that Scot McCloughan’s strong preference is to land a back to compliment to Jones in the draft. And if I’m Thomas, I’m going to be very reluctant to sign with the Redskins until I’m sure they aren’t going to draft a back. He doesn’t want to spend the next five months in a competition he’s likely to lose.

So I think they will stick with the status quo until after the draft. If they don’t find a back in the draft they will reach out to Thomas or someone similar and try to strike a deal.

(Hit me up on Twitter with #NTK @Rich_TandlerCSN or here in the comments to submit a question)

Stat of the day

The last Redskin to lead the NFL in interceptions was Barry Wilburn with nine in 1987. Since 1990 no Redskin has had more than six interceptions in a season (four times, most recently by DeAngelo Hall in 2010).

In case you missed it

  1. colorofmyskinz - Apr 5, 2016 at 5:50 AM

    Yes corner a huge issue. Culliver was not that great of a signing. Huge expense to sit on IR the majority of the time. And Culliver has s torn ACL and MCL. The MCL is what makes Cullivers return to form highly unlikely. Corners need high twitch left to right movements, and that’s you MCL. Not going to have him back in form anytime soon. Corner a huge issue.

    RB? Wow. Big need. We need 1 higher rounder (at least 3-5th round) and another late rounder. I think we need 2 in the draft. Or 1 FA and 1 draft. Bottom line, we need 2 more to go into OTAs.

    Both gaping holes. Come on draft, 3 more weeks to see what our team can be… HTTR!

    • rlundy1123 - Apr 5, 2016 at 6:47 AM

      Agree with you on the corner situation for the most part. I think Culliver was a good signing initially, it just looks bad because of the injury issues. But yeah, those ligaments are going to be tough to come back from–it certainly won’t happen this year.

      This team has so many holes that they can’t all be met in this year’s draft. They have a few young guys coming off of injuries at RB, I might just get one or two inexpensive veterans like Pierre Thomas and be done with that position for this year. That should buy them some time to sort out what they already have in the young guys. I don’t see the running game getting any worse than last year, and tweaking the O-line a bit could help more than adding a new RB.

    • renhoekk2 - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:11 AM

      Jones did not impress that much last year. He had a few plays here and there that were nice, but as a whole his body of work was nothing special. RB is not a position that a player needs to develop and improve at when they get to the NFL (Except pass protection). I don’t know many RB who saw a lot of action their Rookie year and were below average, that suddenly improved dramatically in year two or three. You either have the instincts, vision, and ability or you don’t. It’s not something that develops with NFL coaching. It’s not like other positions where you can be taught better technique to help you play better. Most draft analyst thought the Skins drafted Jones a round or two too early. Looks like they were right. I am hoping they draft two RB’s, one in the 3rd or 4th rd and another late maybe 7th or UDFA. None of the three RB on the roster have shown enough to be guaranteed a roster spot.

      And yes they desperately need at least one CB and one S in the draft.

      • bangkokben - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:58 AM

        I don’t agree with any of your presuppositions concerning the RB position. I do agree that Matt Jones performance thus far has been lacking. There is a learning curve to setting up your blocks and reading your keys both in the passing game and running the ball. A lot of it appears to be instinctual because it’s based on knowing the offense. Jones didn’t always know the offense. Against Chicago last year he completely blows his route in flat and is completely unprepared for the pass. Turning a potential positive game into a negative play.

        • chimpychimps - Apr 5, 2016 at 10:53 AM

          I hope you are right- and that jones will show marked improvement this year.

          He better have learned how to hold onto the football.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 5, 2016 at 2:06 PM

          It’s actually nonsensical to suggest running backs come into the NFL “ready made” as the original post suggest. That all is needed is to tutor the blocking and a way they go. Like many skill positions, running backs have to adjust to the speed of the game. The gaps close quicker and the blocking schemes are different for many coming from spread offenses. Now in Matt Jones case he was rarely used in college at Florida. So the learning curve is particularly significant. There are plenty of running backs that will tell you how much more their game develops between the 1st and subsequent years. You have running backs like Chris Ivory, Mark Ingram, and to some degree Darren McFadden that were little used or low production in their 1st year.

      • chimpychimps - Apr 5, 2016 at 10:51 AM

        agree 100 percent- jones was a disappointment to me for a 3rd rounder. Personally I would rather we grab a RB late- it’s certainly possible to get a decent back late in the draft. There just aren’t that many real game changers at the position.

        When it comes to big boy DL, I would prefer we draft them high. There just aren’t a ton of highly athletic 330 pound men out there.

        Definitely agree that corner is an area of some concern- I think last year that perry fewell did an outstanding job with what he had.

      • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 5, 2016 at 5:58 PM

        I’m playing devils advocate here but RB is definitely the most NFL ready position. All the pundits agree. It’s instinct, it’s feel, it’s vision. Not knowing the offense is something all players struggle with not an issue of graduating the ranks of college and joining the pros. They face the same learning curve as any player would when joining a new team but RB struggle less with the “speed of the game.” When it comes to blocking sure, that’s probably the biggest hurdle because not only are they having to learn complex blocking schemes but now they’re having to block a full grown man that’s been tossing other full grown men aside for the past 5-10 years. Other than that the only thing RB’s out of college are hounded on is not hitting the right lanes or out running their blocking before they have time to set up. Both of those are more so getting adjusted to the offense and timing problems not necessarily, speed of the game issues. Speed can’t be coached. If you can run you can run, the speed of the game doesn’t affect speedsters as much and the bruisers run through it. It’s not like WR where in college you can just be the fastest and not run good routes then need to be coached up before you excel in the NFL. At RB you don’t NEED to know where the cut back lanes are supposed to be, you can get lucky and see them opening up. RB’s are basically running the same plays they have their entire career it’s just knowing the timing within your offense so you can execute better. A DB can be exploited by an experienced QB or WR, they have to be taught discipline not jumping routes, not to hold so technique, and they’re going against offenses that are much more complex. DL pretty much all need to be coached up you have your JJ Watts every now and then but you don’t typically see linemen coming out of college and dominating rookie year. The same can be said for Oline where the coaching is necessary. LB has to cover the pass and run so there’s typically a lot of technique coaching in there. The RB position by nature is so reactionary that if you have the combination of speed, strength and vision/instincts at the pro to elite level you will excel. Most of the duds at RB either didn’t have it all or were overused in college. Maybe if you want to throw Eddie Lacy in there and say weight issues but that has more to do with his passion for playing than being NFL ready. I guess you could argue “well he has to learn how to catch” but that’s not a necessity at that position, it’s nice but plenty of RB’s have made a fortune just running the rock. All in all I agree, a RB is either going to have it in the first 2 years or its T-Rich Town, Browns didn’t wait too long on him and this was when the guy ran so hard they made an NFL rule after him. So much of what RB’s do can’t be taught, it’s truly one of those you have it or you don’t positions. Exactly why it’s taboo to draft so high because you can’t really teach a guy to be fast, change his instincts or to see the field clearly. You can show him mistakes on film and hope he puts it together but if they understand the playbook they shouldn’t be having problems in the first place. The lifespan on RBs is only a few years, mostly because they come in ready to play and take a beating.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 5, 2016 at 6:34 PM

          What pundits are you referring to that support this notion? If it’s the most NFL ready position then why are there any busts with NFL RBs (Trent Richardson …anyone)? If running backs coming out of the draft are so NFL ready then it would make it easy for the scouts and coaches in the draft selection. Yes a running back may have less they need to learn from an assignment perspective on an offense, however development as a running back is still a significant part of a 1st year player just like at wide receiver.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 5, 2016 at 8:02 PM

          You always hear that RB is the most NFL ready position because it takes substantially less coaching than other positions. You are literally just running behind fat people at an angle that doesn’t allow you to be tackled, the same thing you’ve been doing all your life. Maybe the verbiage is different, pulling schemes maybe different but the concept is the same. You don’t have to learn the nuances of the offense like a QB, pre snap read, I ‘ve got blocking here, I’m shooting this gap everything else is reactionary. If you have pro level vision and speed you’ll be fine. I already told you why there are so many busts 1. RB’s at the collegiate level are coming in overused. They’re coming in with a body that’s aged ahead of time which is also why it’s TABOO to touch them in the first round. Also 2. There aren’t very many guys coming out of college that have the attributes I described at the pro to elite level. Because they were a man amongst boys in college doesn’t many anything. You can be fast in college and slow in the NFL. Speed can’t BE COACHED. Nor can vision, if you have a back that has tunnel vision you just gotta try to coach him up. I haven’t read your other replies but I see I have a few more to get to but, it seems like you’re confusing me saying NFL RB’s are the most pro ready with RB’s have the most success. You can be pro ready and play behind a bad line or have a weak QB so they’re dropping 8 in the box on you. “If running backs coming out of the draft are so NFL ready then it would make it easy for the scouts and coaches in the draft selection.” No for one, I never said all RB’s are pro ready. The RB position translates the easiest to the pro level because less has to be taught to the player. Once they’re comfortable with scheme you should see them take off. If they don’t they are probably missing an attribute which means they aren’t ready yet. That doesn’t diminish the fact that the POSITION is the easiest to make a transition from college to pro level. There are players that aren’t ready but they likely are missing a key component and shouldn’t have been drafted in the first place.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 5, 2016 at 6:41 PM

          “At RB you don’t NEED to know where the cut back lanes are supposed to be, you can get lucky and see them opening up.”

          That’s one shallow notion of a statement there. In the NFL those holes don’t stay around long. As a running back you have to understand and anticipate where the holes are coming since you have very little time to hit them. You also have to learn how to anticipate and use blockers at the second level in the NFL more so than in college.

          Again the idea that running backs normally require little development in the NFL is absurd. Especially in today’s game where running backs have fewer opportunities and most actually need to run routes out of the backfield and catch those things call footballs just like wide receivers do.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 5, 2016 at 8:13 PM

          AND AGAIN you have confused me saying all RB’s are pro ready with this position translates the easiest to the NFL. “As a running back you have to understand and anticipate where the holes are” Yes this is called vision and instinct something you likely have to already had developed in your YEARS of playing football. Likely won’t be coached up unless you steal the QB’s helmet and rig it so they can tell you look left look right stop here. Film can help.. maybe but IT’S REACTIONARY. #sigh Go on.. “coming since you have very little time to hit them.” Ah! Can’t teach speed. I knew I was right! For the 900th time, if you have speed, vision/instincts and strength to not get taken down by the first guy (sorry Alf) you will shine. If you don’t here’s the door. But in either scenario, you had the easiest transition to the NFL all you had to do was learn how to block… maybe catch but there are still RBs making a living off of running those things called foolsballs.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 5, 2016 at 6:51 PM

          ” I guess you could argue “well he has to learn how to catch” but that’s not a necessity at that position, it’s nice but plenty of RB’s have made a fortune just running the rock. ”

          In today’s game it is far more the norm for running backs to catch out of the backfield than not. How many running backs in the last 10 years had Marshawn Lynch type careers? You are taking away a major part of a running back’s game today when you assume it’s not a necessity at that position. Tell that to Danny Woodhead, Devonta Freeman, Shane Vereen, Sproles, or even Chris Thompson.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 5, 2016 at 8:24 PM

          If they could run like Lynch they wouldn’t have to. Remember Alfred? We were perfectly find with his Niles Paulian hands until he couldn’t shake that first tackle. If you can run, which is your job, they’ll keep you. You don’t have to try to be something you’re not. Make your self an asset and work on your craft. Alf tried to learn how to catch and forgot how to run (also looked a little smaller). That was… almost as shockingly dumb as the redskins possibly taking a WR with the 21 pick. Didn’t see you in the comment section those days though, that would’ve been fun. Lol you guys make my work nights so fun. For real I wish you could see this Kool Aid smile I’m sporting right now.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:10 PM

          I got pulled away sorry, Let me add that statement I made was a preemptive comment. I was trying to think up issues you would try to bring up as things that need to be coached to RBs. For one if catching is increasingly becoming apart of the running backs duties then it’s likely most, if not all, of the RB’s coming out of the draft are already pass catching RB’s. I only brought it up because we had a RB that couldn’t catch and that wasn’t even the main reason he lost his job.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 6, 2016 at 8:40 AM

          lezziemcdykerson, I don’t disagree with you that a running back has less to learn than other positions like QBs, LBs, DBs, and Safeties. Playing running back is certainly less cerebral in that regard than any of those aforementioned. We are actually moving the conversation here some since the original post surmised that running back require no development other than blocking. That’s even more fringe thinking than the concept of a ready made position. Now if you want to call the running back the most “ready made” position that is fine. However, if I was to really challenge that premise then I’d ask what about kicker, punter, or long snapper?

          Anyway I don’t think running back development is less than the tight end or wide out position. Especially when many tight ends are used more as another blocker or a the wide out that is often used to have to play one spot like in the slot. This I hold firm to because the norm is for running backs today to catch out of the backfield. Most teams are not seeking that one dimensional back that just runs between the tackles anymore because so few today can excel just in that one role.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 6, 2016 at 6:01 PM

          The conversation wasn’t moved here. This is what I stated all along. I think you’re confusing yourself with thinking that I’m applying it to all running backs. It’s like your speaking to the talents of the running backs making them ready made (ie why aren’t they so easy to scout?) where I’m speaking of the position that doesn’t require you to have to learn too much. That was the disconnect yesterday. It’s just that now you’re understanding what I’m saying. KEEP IN MIND the original post from REN stated that running backs typically will show you who they are in year one maybe two. I’m echoing that because RB really only need to learn how to block. Critical thinking: If catching RBs are the norm now in the league, what was it that brought about that change? College right? More RBs coming out had the ability to catch causing most teams to try to shift from one dimensional backs to 3 down backs right? So if the backs coming out already know how to catch what learning curve are they facing when matriculating to the pros? Learning a new offense is not development I believe Ren and I were speaking about. We’re talking about learning how to play the position at the pro level. Playing RB at the college level is not much different than playing at the pro level other than you have to learn how to block bigger stronger and faster opponents. Now if you’re trying to dissect their abilities whether or not they can step in and excel right away that speaks more to the quality of running back you’ve drafted. You don’t see many project RB’s in the league. You may see one get injured and they wait for him to return to form. You may see one struggle with fumbling and they try to see him through it. You may see on struggling with blocking or knowing the offense. You may even see a RB sit behind another one, not a project just as depth, he’s still expected to play like a 1 when his number is called. What you won’t see is a running back come in under perform and still be retained after two years. Trent trucked a guy and the NFL named a friggin rule after him and 20 games later he was traded to the Colts. That’s because they’re on a much shorter leash because the learning curve is a straight line. Wide outs and TE’s have to learn route discipline, NFL rules and there’s a lot of them for receiver blocking downfield, toes in rule etc. The speed of the game also affects them more because they are on an island. They aren’t running behind a wall of people that will separate conveniently so you can get by. RB is reactionary oh there’s a defender JUKE, they’re not learning how to juke at friggin 23 years old Jay. TE’s development is steeper than RB. The blocking is different you’re having to block disengage then run a route, yes the speed of the game affects them there. RB’s typically hang back and POSE as a blocker and allow them to run past so they can catch. In that instance the speed of the game actually works in their favor because their real priority is getting out in space. They’re coming out knowing how to catch which means all they’re really learning is the route tree, notice I didn’t even list that as developmental for either of the skill positions because that affects EVERYONE vets, rookies and former retirees. Learning a pro offense and learning how to play your position at the pro level are two entirely different monsters. Off to reply number 2.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 6, 2016 at 8:58 AM

          “1. RB’s at the collegiate level are coming in overused. ”

          I can’t think of a era of college football where this holds less true than today. In today’s college football you have the spread offense dominating the league. In this type of offense the running back is use as much as at wide receiver as he is running the ball down a lane. Yes there still are the Alabama’s and Michigan’s that are run oriented. However even those teams tend to use more backs than what teams in college did in earlier eras of football.

          No doubt playing running back is the most physically demanding skill position. However the body of the running back is less abused in college today than at any other time I can recall. I probably watch more college football than most that post here and I actually watch more college football than NFL games. I see far less abuse taken on by runners in college and that’s been the case for a decade now. Regardless the position takes a toll on a human body but it’s not the college game wearing them down it’s unfortunate injuries.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 6, 2016 at 6:04 PM

          Unfortunate injuries typically happen to those that are overworked. Also my theory on why you see some teams hitting big on small school RB like Alf because they face less physical defenses than those blue chip D1 schools.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 6, 2016 at 9:05 AM

          “Speed can’t BE COACHED. Nor can vision, ”

          That thought can be applied to the QB and WR as much as it can be the RB. Wide outs can look untouchable in college then quite normal on the field in the NFL. Crowder can’t outrun DBs in the NFL like he did playing for Duke. QB field vision is as much as a gift as it is something that can be refined by some good coaching. You can’t use this as a just a crutch for coaching a running back.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 6, 2016 at 6:42 PM

          I’m trying to see how echoing what I just wrote is helping your argument. “Speed can’t be coached. If you can run you can run, the speed of the game doesn’t affect speedsters as much and the bruisers run through it. It’s not like WR where in college you can just be the fastest and not run good routes then need to be coached up before you excel in the NFL. At RB you don’t NEED to know where the cut back lanes are supposed to be, you can get lucky and see them opening up.” And by lucky I mean you’re lucky enough to possess good instincts and field vision. If they aren’t lucky enough they’ll be one of those players that doesn’t know how to adjust their run to the garbage. That is still speaking to the ability of the player not the transition from college RB to pro RB. Remember I said yesterday that you can draft the wrong guy, you should be drafting a RB with NFL speed. If a GM is conceding that virtue for another like say strength (to shed tackles he can’t get away from Alf and Lynch weren’t burners but they compensated it by being tough to take down) or maybe the back has an afterburner, break away speed but not initial burst then that’s the gamble you take. Either way speed can’t be coached he can get lighter, may affect his durability and his strength. Alf looked smaller last year as well that may have contributed to his decline.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 6, 2016 at 9:15 AM

          “The RB position translates the easiest to the pro level because less has to be taught to the player.”

          Okay now this is something I can agree with to a degree. However for me I read your initial statement below to mean much more…

          “but RB is definitely the most NFL ready position. ”

          However, if you are suggesting the cerebral aspect, as I commented on already, then I see you point here. However again, it’s hard to place a blank statement even when you suggest translates the easiest to the NFL. Many TE just block and many wide outs just run the slot. So there are varying degrees of what roles are played for these position just like it is for running back. If you want to suggest the running back that just runs between the tackles is less demanding than most other positions then I would agree but I’d add that a slot receiver that just runs a handful of routes can be equally less demanding than most other positions.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 6, 2016 at 6:53 PM

          The one thing you quoted was my ENTIRE POINT for the last 24 hours. You gotta be kidding me. Go read the first sentences from all of yesterday’s comments. Facepalmeroni. Do me a favor and join those two quotes subbing out “but” for “making” and understand that this is what I’ve been saying since yesterday. Join me friend.

          “If you want to suggest the running back that just runs between the tackles is less demanding than most other positions then I would agree but I’d add that a slot receiver that just runs a handful of routes can be equally less demanding than most other positions.” I’d like to add that as a slot receiver you need to run that route perfectly. Don’t draw you defender too close to the Z receiver. Find the hole in the zone. Make sure you’re opening up the right way. Wait.. am I opening up or is it over the shoulder? Back shoulder? On the numbers? Where are my defenders coming from since, unlike a RB who catches 4-8 passes a game, I have to look away to locate the ball. Not many TE’s just block. That’s the problem we’re having now. That has been pretty much phased out by college football. We’re seeing more of the Jimmy Grahams, Reed’s and Thomas’ of late. almost makes you wonder who’s doing blitz pickup in college… the RB? Hmmm. Plot thickens buddy.

      • Trey Gregory - Apr 6, 2016 at 3:06 AM

        I have to agree with Bang and Redskins name here. For all the reasons they stated but I’ll add some.

        It’s a little crazy to generalize all college RBs. There are so many different college systems. If you come from a system completely different than what the NFL run, there will be a learning curve.

        True story. Lache Seastrunk was a pretty good RB for Baylor. When he was leaving Baylor my sports writing professor had Brice Petty come by. In small talk, on the side, the professor asked Petty if he was going to miss Seastrunk on the field. Petty gave him a look like, “are you kidding me?” And explained that Seastrunk didn’t know a single play. A play would get called, Seastrunk would look at his teammates, and they would say, “this is where you run left.” That’s when I realized exactly how hard it is to scout college RBs if you don’t know this stuff. Imagine if a RB comes from a system where he just runs in a direction then is asked to learn a playbook, hit certain holes, and understand certain blocking schemes. On top of the speed of the game and all that. It takes time.

        Let’s also remember Jones had two major issues last year. He ran too upright and he fumbled too much. Both of those things come from lack of experience and can be corrected. If he fixes those two things, he’s a lot better. He also missed holes. True. But why wouldn’t that improve with a better understanding of the offense? It’s kind of crazy to think that a RB can’t improve that much from year 1 to year 2.

        • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 6, 2016 at 9:37 AM

          “Let’s also remember Jones had two major issues last year. He ran too upright and he fumbled too much. Both of those things come from lack of experience and can be corrected. If he fixes those two things, he’s a lot better. He also missed holes. True. But why wouldn’t that improve with a better understanding of the offense? It’s kind of crazy to think that a RB can’t improve that much from year 1 to year 2.”

          I completely agree! It’s not guaranteed Jones will be a full time back but his size, speed, hands, and moments of great runs make it worth the investment.

          The Seastrunk scenario reminds me of a similar story on Heath Shuler at Tennessee. It was widely known he couldn’t run a full playbook so the coaches had to slim it down to just a handful of plays in order for him to play the position.

          I think the NFL today probably searches for deficiencies like this today better than in the past. If it is true Shuler wasn’t very sharp then it explains why he move onto politics.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 6, 2016 at 8:24 PM

          This reply didn’t come to me but I wanted to point out that you actually kinda backed up the opposition here.

          *Pulls antenna off nearby car and uses it as a pointer*

          “And explained that Seastrunk didn’t know a single play. A play would get called, Seastrunk would look at his teammates, and they would say, “this is where you run left.” That’s when I realized exactly how hard it is to scout college RBs if you don’t know this stuff. Imagine if a RB comes from a system where he just runs in a direction then is asked to learn a playbook, hit certain holes, and understand certain blocking schemes. On top of the speed of the game and all that. It takes time.” Hmm well that’s funny.

          Ren: “You either have the instincts, vision, and ability or you don’t. It’s not something that develops with NFL coaching. It’s not like other positions where you can be taught better technique to help you play better.”

          Me: “At RB you don’t NEED to know where the cut back lanes are supposed to be, you can get lucky and see them opening up. RB’s are basically running the same plays they have their entire career it’s just knowing the timing within your offense so you can execute better” ” Learning a pro offense and learning how to play your position at the pro level are two entirely different monsters.”

          What you described is learning a pro offense. Learning an offense is one thing, that’s something all rookies will have to do. That’s something all traded players have to do. That’s something all players with new coaching staff put in place have to do. That’s something all unretired players have to do. Go from a running team to a west coast. Go from a 3-4 to a 4-3. The game is ever changing. Wanna know what won’t change? If that RB ran a sub 4.3 he’s going to be fast in the NFL, hopefully he has vision. If that RB had great vision in college, when he gets to the pros it won’t erode, it might even get better with being able to study or having a vet there to break down defenses he’s seen before. If he’s strong and sheds tackles at the college level HOPEFULLY he’ll be able to do it in the pros versus stronger opponents. That’s why I wouldn’t trade speed for strength it’s a gamble. If he doesn’t show the coaches something by year 2 they’re drafting someone else. Why don’t we really see project RBs. You and I had this whole thing about Niles Paul who switched from TE to WR, they gave him time when then one friggin thing he had to learn was how to block. If he’s a WR he should already know how to catch so, other than depth, why is he still around? He was a project TE. He played behind Davis despite his 20 arrests and Reed beat him out immediately with one leg and half an eyeball. Still given chances, still on the team because the learning curve is perceived to be steeper. Alf slid some and they were like naaahhh let’s draft another another one another one, I feel like DJ Khaled.What I want you to walk away from this with is this from Renhoek which I agree with 100% “I don’t know many RB who saw a lot of action their Rookie year and were below average, that suddenly improved dramatically in year two or three. You either have the instincts, vision, and ability or you don’t. It’s not something that develops with NFL coaching.”

          Lace ran a 4.5 and only pumped 15 reps benching. So he wasn’t particularly fast or strong. Could catch but sat behind Alf who couldn’t.

        • Trey Gregory - Apr 6, 2016 at 11:11 PM

          Jesus. If you can’t make a simple point in less than 1,000 words then don’t try.

          I didn’t read it all but I think I got the gist. You missed my point though. A guy operating in that simple of a system is going to struggle when thrown into a complicated NFL system. Cousins doesn’t tell Jones “just run left.” There’s more to it. RBs have to know exactly where to run or how to react depending on what the defense does.

          That was also just one point. Again, Jones can be coached to run lower and have better ball security.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 6, 2016 at 11:41 PM

          Well considering 80% of that was quotes from you, ren and myself. Now you send me two replies and tell me to keep it short. Bye Treylisha. You know I didn’t read past that first sentence not even gonna bother to read your second one.

        • Trey Gregory - Apr 7, 2016 at 2:49 AM

          Well it’s probably not necessary to quote that many things that we can just go back and read.

          I’ve made some pretty damn long posts here before. But damn. I usually feel bad when I see how long mine are. It’s like you’re trying. I’m more than happy to talk some football with you. Just a little hard to get caught up if I only have a few min.

        • lezziemcdykerson - Apr 7, 2016 at 3:33 PM

          Then don’t repy to my posts genius. You still rapping? Sent me two replies last night and then this? Rap star. You sir, need a pamprin. Bye Treylisha(for the second time)

        • Trey Gregory - Apr 6, 2016 at 11:18 PM

          Oh. And RBs DO need to know where cut back lanes are. Or where any movement is or holes are going. It’s absurd to suggest they don’t. You can’t quote yourself saying something as proof that it’s true.

          I would love so much for you to go tell Bill Bellichick that NFL RBs just get lucky and guess where cutback lanes are. I would love to see the look on his face.

          And the Seastrunk that was an anecdote to show exactly how simple some college systems are. Trust me, Derrick Henry had a more complicated system. The point was IT DEPENDS on the college system they come from. And IT’S RIDICULOUS to generalize all running systems like that. These guys don’t all come from the same system.

          I also don’t see how Seastrunk’s combine bench press is relevant to anything. Kind of seems like you’re just saying random things at this point.

    • Nico Carter - Apr 6, 2016 at 3:40 PM

      We need to trade some players for picks an fast, and move some players up some players are better than we know if put in the right spot more will help us on both ends in replacing players upgrading positions in depth we have 8 picks now we can get 12 and get the best players for us in the other 7 rounds

      • Rich Tandler - Apr 6, 2016 at 6:36 PM

        OK, name me a player the Redskins can part with that another team would give up a pick for. I tried here a few weeks ago, couldn’t find any realistic scenarios.

  2. bk70 - Apr 5, 2016 at 6:47 AM

    I don’t think drafting a CB is a big deal this year, but a nice to have. I’m pleased with Breeland, Blackmon and Dunbar as core group. I don’t expect to see Culliver until the season starts with a question mark about his future.
    On the bench you still have Jeremy Harris, Dashaun Phillips and Al Louis-Jean, all showing progress and development. There’s good size and speed among them. I left out Deshazor Everett because I see him as on the bench as a safety and not as the 4th or 5th corner in 2016. I think our GM will select a CB in the later rounds (assuming he gets >8 picks in 2016). Best players will have the chance to make the 53 man roster including those signed as draft picks.

    • bangkokben - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:36 AM

      “On the bench…” What are you talking about? Al Louis-Jean will be lucky if he’s still on the roster after the draft and the signing of undrafted free agents. All of these guys are on the bubble until the draft if over. How are they showing “progress and development?” There can be no contact with the team for at least another two weeks and then it’s only working out until after the draft. Philips, at least got to dress for the last six games and Harris played in the finale against Dallas but that is hardly evidence. Kudos to any of them if they make the final 53 because their chances are only slightly better than yours and mine. None of them were drafted by the Redskins, only Harris was even drafted (7th round, 208th, by Jacksonville in 2013), none of them were even in the Redskins camp last year, and all were signed to the practice squads at varying points last season due to the state of the ‘skins secondary. Any CB drafted by the ‘skins will instantly be ahead of these guys as well as any CB from this year’s class signed after the draft. What these guys have is experience in how the NFL does business and the will to play in the NFL. Rarely does that trump NFL talent. Best of luck to all of them.

    • Mr.moneylover - Apr 5, 2016 at 3:43 PM

      I think Chris culliver will play the last pre game like breeland to knock off some rust

    • Mr.moneylover - Apr 5, 2016 at 3:53 PM

      Actually scot m. Likes Al-Louis jean they signed him to a future contract not all practice squad players under scot m. Gets that…but the question is with guys on the practice squad you don’t know if they come back better or worst they clearly got the advantage over the rookies because they spend the whole year learning the playbook and working on they technique… I remember WR Corey washington who was on the practice squad for two or three weeks soon when he went up against Chris culliver and breeland he couldn’t catch nothing and was cut so it really don’t matter were a player is at on the depth chart right now it can easily change in mini camp….a guy like LB Willie Jefferson might be low on the depth chart but if he show what I know he’s capable of he can easy get playing time

  3. abanig - Apr 5, 2016 at 7:01 AM

    Draft a safety, draft a corner & draft a running back. Done & done.

    • colorofmyskinz - Apr 5, 2016 at 7:24 AM

      Agreed each of those positions drafted, the question is how many at each position? We will be lucky to have Culliver hit a confident form until 8-10 games into the season. It will be real interesting to see how Scot plays this.

      I still think we make a trade to GB. They have 3 different 4th round picks and you know Scot wants those. My guess is we trade our third round pick to GB for their 3, 4th round picks. The draft pointing works out.

      GB we have a deal for you!!

      • babyteal1 - Apr 5, 2016 at 7:47 AM

        Culliver played poorly when healthy so I’m not counting on him to contribute.

        • Mr.moneylover - Apr 5, 2016 at 3:36 PM

          He played threw injury wasn’t really healthy when he played a couple games

        • Trey Gregory - Apr 6, 2016 at 3:17 AM

          Culliver wasn’t really healthy in 2015. I’m having trouble remembering exactly when he was hurt. But he served the suspension then I remember him being hobbled against Atlanta. So what? He played poorly one game? In his first game with the team? Relax a little with Culliver.

          He played football more than just one year in Washington. Before that he had a solid track record of being a good CB. Not elite, but I’m fine putting him in that group right below the elite guys if we’re taking the time he played in San Fran.

          So it’s fair to say he had a bad year in Washington. But you have to acknowledge there were other factors contributing to that other than his skill.

          It’s also fair to be worried about the injury. But none of us really know how the surgery went or the recovery is going. Can we just take the wait and see approach with the guy instead of calling him a horrible acquisition and a bad player?

          We should absolutely plan for him not to be around. But I choose to believe the fact that he wasn’t cut, and another FA CB wasn’t acquired, as a good sign that he’s coming along well. If this guy gets back to form, him and Breeland are going to be awesome together.

      • abanig - Apr 5, 2016 at 8:03 AM

        I think we’ll have a confident Culliver for a month, but he’ll play for 6/8 games.Why would Green Bay do that?

      • ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© - Apr 5, 2016 at 8:53 AM

        Scot likes trading with Seattle. (My evidence: one data point…he did it last year!)

        http://www.hogshaven.com/2015/5/1/8533269/2015-nfl-draft-redskins-trade-with-seattle
        ~

        • Rich Tandler - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:11 AM

          I guess they’ll also trade with the Saints and pick up a 2017 pick, because they did last year.

        • ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:19 AM

          Exactly, Rich.

          That’s how you do projection 101. (You have to take more courses to make better projections. Past results are no guarantee of future success. Offer void where prohibited.)
          ~

      • Mr.moneylover - Apr 5, 2016 at 3:40 PM

        You must haven’t watched last year draft…scot m. Started to trade back after he got his three main guys who will contribute right away…

        • ET - Apr 5, 2016 at 5:54 PM

          Scot does like stockpiling later picks, it seems. And 4-7 are good rounds to pick up “maybes.” Heck, the Jarrett pick was a extra base hit, even with the injury last season. Love that kid. Hopefully Scot finds a few more gems like him in this draft.

  4. smotion55 - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:23 AM

    I have them drafting 1 CB and 1 RB in all of my drafts. CB position very good in this years draft and I pick I up from round 5 on down depending on the board.. I also have them trading down and getting 10 picks in almost all of the mock drafts. I don’t think they are major need ay CB as I do Safety, Dunbar is smart, studies film and is coachable and I think he gets much better in year 2.
    The running back position is 1 of need because we just don’t have a real #1. They got Matt Jones in the 3rd after a trade down so if they trade back maybe another back in the 3rd this year. If Matt Jones doesn’t learn how to run lower and hold on to the ball he will be on the bench or out the door. I hope Redd comes back healthy and Chris Thompson is always hurt. I have them drafting a RB in the 4th round in most mocks and their are a lot of marginal prospects that grade out in the 6th or 7th round that could pan out, since they are devalued I am not sure , most have real good college stats .

    • redskinsnameisheretostay - Apr 5, 2016 at 4:35 PM

      Dunbar has little to know experience in zone coverage. There is way too little known about him to think he is a lock and so CB isn’t a major need. It’s a huge need for this team. Maybe not a huge as safety which there are few prospect in this draft. However, it is as big a need as at D-Line.

    • Trey Gregory - Apr 6, 2016 at 3:23 AM

      Look guys. I’ve done 120 mock drafts and they all end up the exact same. We trade out of the first round and get Jalen Ramsey and Joey Bosa in the second. Then Derrick Henry and Josh Doctson in the 3rd. After that we trade back more and take CB, CB, S, DL, C, C, C, CB, CB, RB, WR, QB, WR, C. It happens every time I make stuff up. So it’s going to happen.

  5. John - Apr 5, 2016 at 9:50 AM

    Rich,

    If Green Bay makes that 3rd round trade with us, then Seattle will have to trade Can Chancellor to us for a Lichtensteiger, a 3rd and a bag of beans LOL…

    • bangkokben - Apr 5, 2016 at 10:07 AM

      That’s not “our” bag of MAGIC beans, is it? Please tell me it’s just the old pintos! Lichtensteiger and a 3rd should be enough. Not the beans. Seattle is so greedy.

      • John - Apr 5, 2016 at 11:01 AM

        What the heck maybe they’ll give us Cam for the beans… Hopefully they don’t realize they’re not magic until it’s to late to rescind the trade….

        • John - Apr 5, 2016 at 11:05 AM

          With our Cincy connection and the Bengals losing Jones and Sanu in FA perhaps they’ll swap 1st with us and we’ll still get a decent DL and some picks?

  6. kenlinkins - Apr 5, 2016 at 12:27 PM

    Rich: IYO is it a smart move to draft more than one player at the same position in the same draft if you are rebuilding?

    • Rich Tandler - Apr 5, 2016 at 12:33 PM

      It could be, if they’re both the best available players. You’re not going to rebuild your team if you bypass the BAP in favor of a lesser player just because you already took a guy at the BAP’s position. Obviously you can’t stockpile QB’s and it can get out of hand. But if they draft 2 DL or 2 WR in this draft, great.

  7. metalman5150 - Apr 5, 2016 at 12:31 PM

    That Culliver hit on Greg olsen and subsequent pick six called back for roughing the tight end will never vanish from my thick skull.

    Momentum is a thing and the skins would have been up a TD against the NFC Champs.

    Probably would have lost, at last but man how could Culliver had played the ball better on that particular play which will go down as a penalty instead of a pick six.

  8. ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© - Apr 5, 2016 at 12:41 PM

    As for drafting a DB in the 1st round, other than Jalen Ramsey (likely a top 3 pick), there aren’t any safeties worth it.

    But there are CBs, so it’s possible McGlue goes that way as BPA.
    ~

  9. Mr.moneylover - Apr 5, 2016 at 3:32 PM

    Its just a lot of question marks with CB and safety

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