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Cowboys have plenty of critics in Dallas

Dec 16, 2013, 6:00 PM EST

Romo after Packers

The Dallas Cowboys are next up for the Redskins and they suffered an agonizing loss of their own on Sunday. They blew a 26-3 halftime lead and lost to the Matt Flynn-led Green Packers 37-36.

After an agonizing loss, nobody sharpens the long knives and puts them to use quite like the Dallas media. Here are some choice snippets:

Here’s Clarence Hill of the Forth Worth Star-Telegram talking about everybody’s favorite goat:

So what happened?

Romo happened. The star-crossed quarterback with a reputation for playing his worst in the biggest moments tossed two interceptions in the final 2 minutes, 46 seconds of the game.

The first one came with the Cowboys still up 36-31 and trying to milk the clock. But instead of running out the clock, he checked out of a run call to a pass play and then reverted to his gunslinger mode with an ill-advised pass to receiver Miles Austin.

Cornerback Sam Shields picked it off, setting up the Packers’ go-ahead touchdown, a 1-yard run by Eddie Lacy with 1:31 left.

Randy Galloway, also of the Star-Telegram, sets the sights for his comments higher:

The easy answer is this:

Fire everybody. Now.

But since there’s nobody to jettison Jerry Jones, that allows his butt to wiggle off the hook. For nearly two decades, Jerry has done no time for his multiple football crimes.

Speaking, however, of blame:

Honk if you are guilty of having overrated Mr. Jones’ current maggot-mess of a football club.

Personally, I’m leaning on the horn based on a seasonlong assessment that the Cowboys were the epitome of NFL mediocrity.

The month of December, however, has totally exposed the fallacy of that theory.

On ESPN Dallas, Jean-Jacques Taylor took the man in the middle of Romo and Jones to task:

From 1:04 of the third quarter until Romo’s interception with 2:58 left, the Cowboys dropped back to pass on 14 of 15 plays, while never leading by fewer than five points.

Ridiculous. Blame Garrett.

Jerry Jones made Garrett a walk-around head coach in the offseason to handle situations just like this. He’s supposed to speak up in certain situations and dictate the strategy.

This is when Garrett should’ve demanded the Cowboys run the ball, especially since Green Bay couldn’t stop Murray.

[Snip]

But Garrett took a passive role and let Romo and Callahan dictate the offensive approach instead of asserting himself. What happened in the last five minutes is a fireable offense.

I guess when you have a historic collapse (Dallas was 42-0 all time when leading by 20 or more at halftime) like that, one that seriously damaged the team’s playoff chances, there is plenty of blame to spread around.

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